Nida Lighthouse

Nidos švyturys
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Nida Lighthouse

Construction of the first Nida Lighthouse began during the 2nd half of the 19th century after the war of German unification. The hexagonal, red-brick, 27 metre-heigh tower was built at the same time when the 51.4-metre-high Urbas Hill was being afforested. For that purpose, a special plank road was paved towards the peak. The lighthouse began operating on October 20, 1874. It could then be reached by a cobblestone path containing 200 steps, which have survived to the present day. This cobblestone path was built by the French soldiers who were taken captive in 1870-1871 by Germans during the Franco-Prussian War . A Fresnel lantern was installed in the old Nida lighthouse. It used a mineral oil burner. Every 10 seconds, it produced a 4-second flash visible at the sea for a distance of 21 nautical miles. The first lighthouse in Nida functioned until the end of the WWII, when it was blown up in 1944 by the withdrawing German soldiers. But already in 1945, a temporary lighthouse was built, while in 1953, it was rebuilt. The present-day Nida lighthouse is a reinforced concrete tower of cylindrical shape with horizontal red and white stripes. Its height is 29.3 metres. The lighthouse transmits white-light signals which can be seen at the sea for 41 km (22 nautical miles). The lighthouse is located approximately 900 metres away from the sea and is 79 metres above the sea level. Nida Lighthouse as well as Klaipėda Lighthouse have been added to the global books of light signs (Lith. pasaulio šviesos ženklų knygos), marine charts and described in water piloting books (Lith. locija). Until November 2016, the old lighting system functioned in the lighthouse. It had as many as 6 lamps installed, and only one was lit at a time. When this lamp used to burn out, another lamp would switch on. The lighthouse had crystal lens installed. They were made in the Izium Plant in the area of Kharkov in Ukraine. Before arriving to Nida, it earned an award at an international exhibition in Paris. The lighthouse used to send out rotating light flashes: two short ones and one long. Later, the lighthouse’s optical devices, produced in 1950, became old, while the resources of necessary parts and lamps to repair them were lacking. Therefore, it was decided to replace them with more modern ones. At the end of 2016, the lighthouse’s old optical devices were replaced with three large LED beacons. Two beacons emit flashing light signals towards the sea, and one smaller beacon – towards the Curonian Lagoon. The lighthouse’s new beacons now emit bright white light. Thus, it is easily distinguishable from the yellow light emitted by other objects. Nida Lighthouse has a flashing sequence that is unique: two short white flashes 0.2-second long with a gap of 1.2 second between, following a 4.2-seconds gap (darkness). The total interval of light and darkness is 5.8 seconds. Light signals are produced by the lighthouse only during the dark period of a day. By dusk, the lamp automatically turns on, and by dawn it automatically turns off. The lighthouse has an autonomous electric power station, so light is emitted even when there is no electricity supply. Nida Lighthouse serves as a navigation mark which helps ships orient themselves at the sea by flashing light. During the consecration of Nida lighthouse in 1991, it was given the name of Saint Peter, the patron of fishermen.

Opening hours:
1 September - 17 October III-VII 12:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.
18 October - 31 OctoberVI-VII 12:00 P.M. to 5 P.M.

Tickets can be purchased at the lighthouse's ticket counter.
Ticket prices:
EUR 5.00 for adults
EUR 3.00 for pupils, students, pensioners
EUR 8.00 for families
More information by telephone no. +370 469 52260.